Archive for October, 2017

Miscellany

October 15, 2017

Skye Nature Group has its first meeting next Wednesday, 18th October. We shall be exploring the woods in the vicinity of the Kinloch Lodge Hotel.

The survey has so far resulted in an encouraging 33 positive responses and 6 “maybes” to the question: “Are you interested in being part of an informal Skye Nature Group?”

This lichen has been identified by Nick & Steve as Peltigera hymenina. It is growing by my front door. Not rare but attractive at this stage.

Peltigera hymenina

Peltigera hymenina

This bristletail turned up in the bath. As it is a top of the shore inhabitant I suspect small grandchildren as the dispersal agent. I have looked at it under the microscope and using the key at bristletail.net I am content that it is Sea Bristletail (Petrobius maritimus) rather than the very similar P. brevistylis.

Petrobius maritimus (2)

Sea Bristletail

Less pleasingly, a few days ago I was shown a New Zealand Flatworm from a polytunnel not far from home here on Raasay.

Hawkweeds on Muck

October 6, 2017

David McCosh has determined my 2017 Hieracium specimens. I realise this a niche activity but the three from Muck, H. argenteum (Silvery Hawkweed), H. deganwyense (Deganwy Hawkweed) and H. subrubicundum (Large-leaved Hawkweed) turned out to be new to Muck, with H. deganwyense new to VC104.

No pictures either, I am afraid.

 

Skye Nature Group

October 4, 2017

 A new group is being set up to complement Skye Botany Group, looking at other groups of organisms. If you live in or visit Skye, please would you complete the survey here https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/FTQ958G so that we can attempt to maximise its potential? Thank you.

No Trees

October 4, 2017

Yesterday, I went looking for Sorbus rupicola (Rock Whitebeam) at some known sites in the Elgol and Kilmarie/Drinan areas. I didn’t find any. However, I do know one very good site for it around there – and there is plenty of possible ground to cover, at least in one area.  It grows on cliffs and is usually only present in small numbers. One day I shall have another go.

However, it was a good day. I checked several areas of roadside for Juncus bufonius/ranarius and was relieved to find that they were all the former which is what I have been commonly recording. Whilst J. ranarius is to be found in that habitat, it appears to be in the minority.

I am always pleased to see Carex otrubae (False Fox-sedge), which is always coastal here:

Carex otrubae Elgol

Carex otrubae at Elgol

I was briefly uncertain as to the identity of a thicket on the hillside, but when I got close, it turned out to have arisen from a fallen Gean (Prunus avium):

Prunus avium thicket

Some of the larger stems are showing the distinctive bark:

Prunus avium bark

Near Kilmarie and Drinan some Parnassia palustris (Grass-of-Parnassus) was still in flower:

Parnassia Kilmarie area 171003.jpg

Parnassia palustris

Less welcome was the large number of Cotoneaster integrifolius (Entire-leaved Cotoneaster) plants:

Cotoneaster integrifolius S of Kilmarie

Cotoneaster integrifolius

I recorded a number of plant pathogenic fungi. This sycamore leaf has Rhytisma acerinum (Tar Spot), Cristulariella depraedens (Sycamore White Spot) and galls caused by mites:

Sycamore leaf with fungi & galls