To Hartaval from the West

Yesterday, I parked at Keistle and headed east to record in tetrads NG45R & S. The former had one previous record – for Koenigia islandica (Iceland-purslane) with the comment “Needs checking – based on dots on photocopied map. W end of Beinnn an Lochain”. I found no sign of it there, and indeed no likely looking habitat.

At Keistle there were a few plants of Iris spuria (Blue Iris) in an area where garden rubbish had been disposed of. There were also a couple of these plants in the nearby garden. FWIW, a new VC record.

Iris spuria Keistle

Iris spuria (Blue Iris)

NG45S includes Bealach Hartaval – and the Hartaval summit itself – but only 9 taxa had been recorded previously including Koenigia islandica (Iceland-purslane) and Minuartia sedoides (Cyphel).

The Koenigia islandica was looking its usual magnificent self:

Koenigia

Koenigia islandica

and the Cyphel was all over the place. However, it was easy to add pleasing and/or significant finds to the tetrad such as Draba incana (Hoary Whitlowgrass), Juncus triglumis (Three-flowered Rush), Luzula spicata (Spiked Wood-Rush), Oxyria digyna (Mountain Sorrel), Persicaria vivipara (Alpine Bistort), Poa glauca (Glaucous Meadow-grass), Saussurea alpina (Alpine Saw-wort), Saxifraga hypnoides (Mossy Saxifrage), Saxifraga nivalis (Alpine Saxifrage), Saxifraga oppositifolia (Purple Saxifrage), Silene acaulis (Moss Campion), Thalictrum alpinum (Alpine Meadow-rue) and Trollius europaeus (Globeflower).

All in all a successful day with tetrad totals raised from 1 dubious to 129 in NG45R and from 9 to 125 in NG45S.

I also  found some new (to me) fungi on Alchemilla glabra (Smooth Lady’s-mantle) (Later: fungus was Coleroa alchemillae), Valeriana officinalis (Common Valerian) (Later: fungus was Ramularia valerianae) and Rumex acetosella (Sheep’s Sorrel), though I think the last is Ramularia pratensis as found on Rumex acetosa (Common Sorrel) (Correct!).

Oh yes, and I managed a reasonable photo of a Small Heath:

Small Heath

Small Heath

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