Allt Diubaig, Abhainn Ghlinn’ Uachdaraich (Red Burn) and Heisary Burn

On Friday, I spent time in a tetrad with no records and another with 7 species recorded in 1968.  I re-found five of the latter but not Carex pauciflora (Few-flowered Sedge) or Rhyncospora alba (White Beak-sedge) – it is too early to spot them readily and I didn’t hit the right habitat anyway.

However, much fun was had, with both tetrads showing Gymnocarpium dryopeteris (Oak Fern):

Gymnocarpium dryopteris

Gymnocarpium dryopteris

The forestry plantation in the more southerly tetrad had Alnus incana (Grey Alder), A. rubra (Red Alder) and Sorbus intermedia agg. (Swedish Whitebeam) as well as the dominant Picea sitchensis (Sitka Spruce) and Pinus contorta (Lodgepole Pine), but along the burn there was quite a lot of undisturbed habitat with Polystichum aculeatum (Hard Shield-fern) and  Trollius europaeus (Globeflower) – always a problem to photograph without a polarising filter:

Trollius

Trollius europaeus

In the northerly tetrad, which is mostly forestry plantation, amongst Sphagnum in wet woodland there was Neottia cordata (Lesser Twayblade):

Neottia cordata

Neottia cordata

In one area the Alchemilla glabra (Smooth Lady’s-mantle) was infected with Trachyspora intrusa (Lady’s-mantle Rust):

Trachyspora intrusa

Trachyspora intrusa

and there were Clouded Border moths about:

Clouded Border

Clouded Border

The more southerly tetrad had more Equisetum pratense (Shady Horsetail) than I have ever seen before and also some fertile shoots, which I have never seen before:

Equisetum pratense

Equisetum pratense

The fertile shoots are thicker and the teeth very different from the sterile shoots so just in case they are of hybrid origin, I have taken a specimen for expert opinion.

Other nice-to-see plants included Hymenophyllum wilsonii (Wilson’s Filmy-fern), Hypericum tetrapterum (Square-stalked (St John’s-wort) and Populus tremula (Aspen).

This is how Betula pubescens (Downy Birch) can get in sheltered wet woodland:

Festooned birch

Festooned birch

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